Social May Win At Volume. But, What About Influence?

Research shows social media is often less than 5% of all Word of Mouth on a particular subject. With the many different ways to look at this, we decided to focus on volume over impact – with the recent topic of Scottish Independence, as well as the focus on Millennial culture and digital behavior.

After a robust social media blitz that indicated a potential separatist landslide, Scotland decided to remain a part of the United Kingdom. Appinions did some digging and noted that news versus social means different formats lead to different impact. Sometimes social can win the volume game, but still lose on the influence game; social can be efficient but not effective.

Above data via Appinions

The win at volume gets tremendous contribution from Millennials. In the last decade, this group is a paramount focus for brands and organizations. Rising into adulthood at the start of the century, their impact has proven to be a major focus to take fast action toward, from the White House and the auto industry to global and social issues.

As we start to plan our trip to Hollywood next month for the WOMMA Summit we reviewed our “A-Ha!” moments from the April 2014 WOMMNext event. Our attention returned to this data point: Millennials spend close to 18 hours per day on their smart devices (via Crowdtap). But for brands, Word of Mouth still overtakes all that time spent when it comes to influence and impact. Despite Millennials’ time in the digital space, still 84% of these Word of Mouth impressions from Millennials result from offline conversations, the majority being face-to-face, according to the latest research from the Keller Fay Group.

Escalate sees program-specific results that support the assertion that social media, while not a tactic to be ignored, is perhaps not as revolutionary a marketing innovation as some would have us believe. Through our experiential programs, we learned that:

  • Face-to-face recommendations for a client brand were 15X more likely to include desired key brand messages than social media recommendations.
  • Analysis of a one-month spike (>2X the next-highest month that year) in digital “buzz” about a client brand found that 80% of all digital “conversation” was, in fact, neutral in tone (for example: on Twitter, a simple re-tweet without a meaningful personal comment; a shared Facebook post with no point of view from the consumer)

As much as the research can be revealing, Millennials are still a very digital generation and sharing online is a part of their makeup. But, it’s not the only way they communicate, and far from the most common…or most effective. All marketing touch points need to be considered. Social is just one of them. In order to reach Millennials and make their way into their conversations, brands need to be as authentic and transparent as they possibly can. Otherwise, no matter what the the format, they’ll tune it out and the message can die. Brands need to consider all the channels, especially the real world.


image via WOMMA

As Millennials are increasingly tapped into digital media, the question isn’t whether they hear a brand message, but if they’ll listen, and talk about it with their friends.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s